Recipes for
Finger Paint
Therapy Street for Kids
      No need to worry about your toddler getting some of this in his/her
    mouth; all ingredients are edible (except for the optional Tempura
    powder).  But, please, don't encourage it!  Store bought brands of
    finger paint are not edible.

    Easiest-ever Finger paint
    Ingredients:
  • instant vanilla pudding (prepare according to box instructions)
  • food coloring

    Divide pudding into different containers.  Add a different color of
    food coloring to each.


    Flour-based Finger paint
    Ingredients:
  • 2 cups white flour
  • 2 cups cold water
  • food coloring
  • 1 Tb. glycerin for shine (usually sold in drug stores)

    In a large bowl, put in water.  Slowly add the flour while
    stirrling constantly.   When fully mixed and smooth, divide it
    into different containers.  Add a different color of food
    coloring to each.  Powdered Tempura paint can also be used for
    color.


    Cornstarch Finger paint
    Ingredients:
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • food coloring
  • 1 Tb. glycerin for shine (usually sold in drug stores)

    In a medium pot, bring 2 cups of water to a boil.  In a separate
    bowl, dissolve cornstarch in with a cup of water.   Add
    cornstarch mixture to boiling water.  Stir constantly.  Boil until
    the mixture is clear and thick.  This will take about about 1
    minute.  Remove from heat and allow mixture to cool.  Divide
    mixture into separate bowls and add a different color of food
    coloring to each.  
     
         Finger painting is a great activity
    for pre-schoolers who may not be
    ready to produce art using crayons,
    markers or pencils.  It allows them
    to use both hands to produce great
    works of art!  And it's a great
    activity for developing fine motor
    and visual motor skills.

           Also, finger painting is a form
    of "messy play" which provides a
    variety of sensory experiences for
    young children.  Let your toddler
    enjoy spreading and smushing the
    finger paint around on the paper.  
    The walls around the bathtub is also
    a fun place to do this and it contains
    the mess.  

           For variety, use craft (popsicle)
    sticks, chunks of sponges and even
    large chunky paint brushes to push
    the paint around.  This way they also
    experience different textures while
    they are painting.
    Helpful Hint
    Most paper will get soggy and easily tear apart.  If you don't want to purchase finger painting
    paper that has a protective coating on one side, you can have the child do their finger painting on a
    large plastic tray (which will also help contain the mess) or on a smooth table top.  When done, you
    can either take a picture of it for posterity or lay construction paper over it lightly, then lift it
    off gently to preserve it.